Summer Reading Challenge Week 2

Scythe by Neal Shusterman


It is a post-mortal age. Humans no longer die from disease or accident or even age. There is no war and no government, and instead almost everything is perfectly controlled by the “thunderhead.” But there is a problem that not even the technology in the cloud, sound familiar, can control: the growing population. The scythes exist outside the control of the thunderhead and their job is to provide balance by systematically gleaning people to keep numbers in check. They were once an honourable group, operating by a code and a system of internal laws. But now, some are using their position to gain power, and there are few of the old guard left to stop them.
Plaid and Plagiarism by Molly Macrae


Janet Marsh, her daughter and two friends have bought a bookshop in Inversgail in the Scottish highlands and are looking forward to moving permanently into their long-time vacation home there to run their shop. But when Janet finds the local advice columnist dead in her shed, the list of suspects, and motives, seems endless. Apparently no one has anything good to say about Una Graham, and suspicious behavior abounds. The twisted trail leads directly to Janet’s ex-husband, among others, as blackmail, affairs and intrigue are revealed.

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Summer Reading Challenge Week 1 

The Secret Path by Gord Downie and Jeff Lemire.

 

The Secret Path tells the story of Chanie Wenjack, a young aboriginal boy who died in 1966 while trying to escape from his residential school and travel home. As is often the case with a good graphic novel, few words are needed to tell this shocking and heartbreaking story of abuse. Lyrics from the ten songs from the album of the same name, written by Gord Downie and the Tragically Hip, are interspersed with Lemire’s simple yet effective illustrations. The combination is as unique as it is powerful.
The Trouble with Goats and Sheep by Joanna Cannon

Margaret Creasy is missing. Why? What has she learned that no one wants her to know? Told through the voices of two young girls, the disappearance has the whole street in an uproar. There are many secrets about one dark night in 1967 when Walter Bishop’s home was set alight by his neighbours determined to drive him away. But there is more to the story than any individual knows; the truth only existing in its many fractured parts. A wonderful book with many unexpected twists and turns, as well as an innocent search for God, who is rumoured to exist everywhere.